Reducing Balanitis Risk Proper Cleansing for the Uncircumcised Penis

  • Added:
    Oct 23, 2013
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Reducing Balanitis Risk Proper Cleansing for the Uncircumcised Penis Photo by John Dugan

They say that cleanliness is next to godliness, but if men spend too much time lathering up and too little time rinsing off, they could end up with a numb penis or a painful foreskin as a reward. That's because irritants in soap can cause balanitis, and when that condition takes hold, intense penis care may be required in order to soothe the pain.

Understanding Balanitis

The skin that covers the penis is designed to bend and stretch, so it can support the expansion that the penis goes through when things get a little heated in the bedroom. This kind of movement of the skin is, in general, not painful at all. But when the skin stretches due to irritation, the sensation is far from pleasurable.

The term balanitis refers to any kind of swelling that impacts the foreskin or the head of the penis. It's a common problem for men who haven't been circumcised, as balanitis is often associated with improper cleansing. Discarded cells and bodily fluids trapped beneath the foreskin can turn into a toxic mixture that makes tissues swell, and that problem is often referred to as balanitis.

However, the condition can also strike when harsh soaps or perfumed cleansers come into contact with the sensitive skin that lines a man's Johnson. This skin tends to live a coddled life, as it's tucked into underwear and pants for most of the day, and it can react with intensity when it's harshly treated. Even when the rest of the body doesn't react, penile tissues can be dramatic when they're exposed to chemicals.

Typically, the reaction isn't immediate. A man's shower might move forward without much pain at all. But a few hours later, a niggling sensation of pain might set in, and without treatment, swelling and numbness can take hold.

Prevention is Key

Most cases of balanitis clear up with a bit of medicated cream prescribed by a doctor. These ointments can combat any infection that's taken hold, and they can help to calm and soothe irritated tissues. However, men can also take steps to prevent balanitis altogether, so they have no need for any kind of medical intervention at all.

Often, this means cleaning the penis and foreskin with warm water and massaging fingertips. No harsh cleansers are needed in order to keep the area clean. A simple stream of water and a manual scrub down should do the trick.

Ideally, all irritating substances should not touch the penis at all, including:

  • Perfumed soaps
  • Body washes
  • Scented bath water
  • Shampoo

If these substances do happen to come into contact with a man's privates, a clear stream of water can be a lifesaver. Spending a minute or more just rinsing off, both over and under the foreskin (if applicable), can help to wash the irritants down the drain, so they won't have time to do anything horrible to a man's vital tool.

A penis health creme (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil) might also play a role in balanitis prevention. These products help penile skin to stay moist and supple, rather than cracked and dry, so particles of soap and irritants won't have a place to lodge and cause harm. The vitamin content of a quality product can also help to nourish penile skin, so it's prepared to fight off an infection. Applying a penis health creme after a shower can also help a man to remove the smallest trace of irritants that a rinse may have left behind. With a penis health creme at the ready, he'll keep his skin both healthy and happy, free of the bad kind of swelling.

Author's Profile

Visit www.man1health.com for more information about treating common penis health problems, including soreness, redness and loss of penis sensation. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous online web sites.


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